Guest post: Interview with Kristine Simelda

This week’s guest post is an interview with the lovely Kristine Simelda, author of A Face in the River. Enjoy!

Kristine Simelda by Images Dominica_5Interview with Kristine Simelda

Q01 – When did you decide you wanted to become a writer?

I wore many caps—daughter, wife, mother, artist, florist, horse trainer, gallery manager, and restaurateur before I started to write. But when I took the giant leap and moved from the States to the Eastern Caribbean island of Dominica twenty-three years ago, I was so fascinated by the change in environment and the diverse characters I met that I felt compelled to describe my cross-cultural experiences in writing.

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Guest post: But for the Grace

This week’s guest post is the lovely Annette Rochelle Aben who has written a short story. Enjoy!

AnnetteBut For The Grace

by Annette Rochelle Aben

Being swallowed by the dark, Caryn felt she’d never live to see the dawn…

Everything was in place. It was only a matter of time. Caryn knew she had made the right decision and there was no turning back.

She settled on the loveseat, glanced at the clock and noted that the hour was fast approaching. Calling to her two companions was unnecessary, her babies hopped up into her lap within moments of her sitting. How funny her male cats were in comparison to the females she had in the past. Her male cats were the most affectionate, always wanting to be on her lap, sleeping next to her in bed and enjoyed being petted. Caryn gently stroked each of the cats pouring as much love as she had into each caress.

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Guest Post – The Eternal Scribbler.

I was given the opportunity by Lorraine Amber’s to be a guest post on her Blog! This is my first time guest blogging 🙂 so I discussed the early pages of a manuscript. Enjoy and do check out Lorraine’s blog it is full of great articles.

Lorraine Ambers

As writers we have to a pretty hefty job of carrying all those characters, worlds, ideas around in our heads desperate to come out and be added to the blank page.

Today I want to talk about the first few pages of your book.

The first pages of a book are what sell it. You can have a fancy cover, great blurb and a dazzling plot – but if you fail in the first few pages, you could have lost your chance to shine.

Writing novel book plot character

This is one of the reasons I usually write my first chapter last or at least after much more of the book is written. This allows me to move the scenes around and sometimes find a mid-scene that works better for the first chapter.

From publishers to readers, those few pages have to be gripping (not talking suspenseful, unless…you know…you’re writing a suspense novel!) but they…

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How do I find time to write?

Manage your time, organise your time, organize your time, get organisedI thought I’d write about it finding time! I have done articles on time-management before, but there’s always more to say.

Finding Time sounds so strange, as if rooting between the sofa cushions may yield a few extra scraps of time we didn’t know we had. 🙂

Someone recently asked whether they could make money from writing full time. In truth almost all writers want to write full time. Who doesn’t want to get paid doing what they love?

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Guest Post: To Speak with Temperance

This week’s guest poster is the awesome author Icky who, with his lovely muse Miss Persephone Plumtartt, discuss some writing wisdom! I hope you all enjoy this post as much as I did 🙂

Icky.jpg

Icky and Kitka (the cat)

To Speak with Temperance

by Icky

“Eek! Dig it, Miss Plumtartt! We are guest hosts on Ari Meghlen’s highly touted writing blog, ‘Eternal Scribbler’!

“Quite so, Mr. Temperance. Miss Meghlen is very kind. Is there a purpose for our being here?”

“Oh, yes Ma’am! Miss Ari wants me to share some writing advice!”

“ . . .

I beg your pardon, sir, but did you say that you were consulted for writing wisdom? Tell me, why did you not explain your lack of understanding on the subject and make your apologies, eh hem?”

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Dealing with tough times

stru1There is an ironic reason this blog post never made it up on Friday. It was because I haven’t been dealing well with my tough times.

In truth this year has put me through the wringer and because last year was pretty rough too, I am just struggling to find the energy to keep going.

Friday was particularly hard and I crashed badly. Now there is nothing more depressing than feeling hollowed out by everything and realising you really don’t have anyone you can talk to.

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Guest Post: Author Toni Cox

This week’s guest poster is the wonderful Toni Cox, author of the Elemental Trilogy, who shares with us her experiences and difficulties she has overcome and how writing played a part in that. Enjoy! 🙂

Toni_Cox_profile_pic[1].jpgMy love for reading began when I was 11 years old and I was given a book for Christmas. It was “The Black Stallion” by Walter Farley. I started horse riding when I was very young, so the book spoke to me on so many different levels. From then on, I saved every bit of pocket money I could and bought one book of the series every month.

I have been an avid reader since then, reading a variety of genres, but the fantasy genre holds a very special place in my heart. Fantasy books are an escape from reality and when you feel that you need to step away from life for a little while, a good fantasy book can do that for you.

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EDITING 101: 13 – Self-Editing Part 1…

Due to a family emergency that I have been dealing with this last few days I haven’t had chance to sort a blog post. So I thought I would share this great editing article.

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Originally posted as the Dun Writin’—Now Whut? series on this blog, EDITING 101 is a weekly refresher series for some of you and brand new for others.

Courtesy of Adirondack Editing

Self Editing Part 1

Some of the things we’ve discussed previously are good to be on the watch for and remove, but there are other, specific tasks that can be done when a manuscript’s completed to help polish it. Since there are many of these odd jobs, this specific post will continue over time.

Editing your own work involves hard labor. Other authors have mentioned they make as many as ten to fifteen passes in editing, revising, and reworking, focusing on one or two aspects of self-editing each time. Those authors are to be commended, since writing a book is only one third of the work. Editing is the second third, and publishing and marketing take up the final third. You’re…

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How To Finish Your Writing Projects

Check out this post about finishing writing projects from Robert over at PartTimeNovel

PART-TIME NOVEL

Last week I listened to a podcast about creativity. In it writer Jeff Goins and Dr. Keith Sawyer discuss how creative people function and the contents of Dr. Sawyer’s book Zig Zag. One idea they mentioned was that writing or creativity does not have to be perfect. But there should be movement from one project to another.

Besides fear, this is one of the main issues I have with writing. Battling the urge to make a billion tweaks until it reaches perfection versus sending out projects before they are finished is a weekly struggle.

I forget that having a process means that some of my writing will work and some will fail and whatever form of failure I feel is not a reflection of me. Finishing anything – a book, a blog post, a book proposal – is an opportunity to learn how to write better.

Finish - Track

The trouble is that I thought any writing process needed to be straightforward…

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Fine tune your writing with detail

cal-0814-va4-detect_07I thought I would do a quick article about ‘detail’ in writing. I think it can be one of those things that gets overlooked.

While we can wax lyrical in our descriptions we can still end up missing something and that can often be extra detail.

But why is detail so important?

Simply because detail adds an extra layer to the writing to help draw the reader deeper into your world.

Maybe you’re sat there thinking “well I add detail, I fill my writing with description.” Great, you should make sure there is strong description. But too often writers can end up using notion rather than detail.

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