Using a Pen Name

man hiding behind ask mark

While we may not be Batman, writing is one of the few professions were you can have a secret identity….well….a false name at least.

So, with that said, should you use a Pen Name? (and no, I wouldn’t recommend using “Batman” as your Pen Name…though that would be amusing)

That really is a question only you can personally answer.

Some people prefer to see their actual birth name on the spine of a book. Others prefer the anonymity of a pen name (pseudonym).

However before you go rushing to choose your new name or to perhaps sneer at the very idea of using anything other than you given name, let’s look at the effects it can have.

GENDER

Unless you have a gender-neutral name, your name will probably expose your gender.

Is this a problem? Well, yes and no. Firstly, no it shouldn’t be a problem and it is not always a problem. However, yes it can sometimes be a problem.

While many readers don’t care for the gender of the author, some readers admit to avoiding books by someone who is the opposite gender to them. This often comes from the assumption that women right female main characters and men write male main characters.

So if a man doesn’t feel as in touch with a female main character, he may avoid reading books written by women and vice versa.

Pretty sad really, because I’ve read some great books by women whose protagonists were male and men whose protagonists were women.

JK Rowling specifically chose to use initials rather than her first name as it was seen that books were the protagonist was a young boy, would be heavily read by boys… who may be put off by a female author. So to combat this, she chose to represent her name this way that would conceal her gender.

As mentioned this is not the majority of the case thank goodness! Most avid readers don’t judge by what gender the author is. However some people do and there have been instances were editors do too.

GENRE

Genre is another one of those areas that can be “considered” dominated by a specific gender. Whether that is true, there are readers who again may shy from certain authors.

For example Romance appears to be considered a female-dominated genre. Are their male writers of romance? Yes. Are they successful? Yes some are. However there are a lot more male writers of romance who choose to use female pen names.

In a supposedly female-dominated genre, by doing this those women who may have been put off by a male author, would not know the difference and would then buy the book. If they later found out, they have already read the work and if they liked it may be more open to male authors.

Heavy action or sci-fi has often been seen as a male-dominated genre. That is definitely changing but again, I’ve met men who won’t even contemplate reading a sci-fi book written by a woman.

SINGLE OR MULTIPLE

If you have an interest to write over several genres you may consider whether you want a different Pen Name for different genres. Obviously having several names may not be the best, but there are a number of authors who use two different pen names for their different genres.

Using the same name has a benefit of you already having a fan base. So say you use Jane Doe as your pen name and write romance. Then you switch to crime using Jane Doe again. Those fans of your Romance will see your name and possibly buy your crime book.

However there is the possibility that those fans may not be crime fans. Maybe even though it is crime, they still expected you to pull out your typical romance and so were disappointed. Who can say?

BEYOND THE PSEUDONYMS

Before the Internet people who used Pen Names could hide within the secret name. Stephen King also wrote under the name Richard Bachman, going so far as to include a false photo of “Richard Bachman” and writing an About the Author.

Of course, nowadays no one knows how long the secret of your true identity will be hidden for. After all someone will want to update your page on Wikipedia!

Also, all it takes is going to a book signing to either a) out your gender or b) out your real name (if someone who knows you happens to be there). So it is a big possibility that your Secret Identity if you choose to have one… may not remain secret.

BOOK SHELF

Another point to consider when thinking about a Pen name is bookshelf placement. Books are arranged on shelves by author name, surname to be exact. So if you have a last name that begins with T for example, chances are you are going to end up pretty low down.

Is this a problem?

Yes, because people are lazy. Most people don’t like to bend down. People prefer to do their browsing at eye level. This does not mean that having a name or choosing a name that starts with a letter at the end of the alphabet will be bad. But you might not get seen as often as you should… at least not in a bookstore.

WHAT’S IN A NAME?

If you do decide on a Pen name, think carefully about what it should be. Consider things like length, a very long name might not look so great on a book cover or spine. A difficult to pronounce name might not be one that gets discussed as much.

LEGALITY

There is no legality issue with having a pen name, as long as payment, paperwork and taxes are all made out to your real legal name and not your pen name.

The only legality can come if there is already an author using the same name as you. People can fight over their names although even just adding in an initial or spelling a name different (think Stephen or Steven) can help to remove that issue.

PERSONAL CHOICE

In the end the choice to use Pen Name(s) is yours. There are reasons why people use them, reasons why people don’t. Often the biggest issue comes from the identity of gender and how it does seem to affect some readers.

My own personal advice on the matter, if you decide to use a Pen Name, think about if for a while. Decide on a few you like, check to see if other authors already use it (not to say you can’t, there is more than one Jacqueline Carey apparently.) However as mentioned above, it is always best to avoid using the same name as an already existing author.

You want something that works for you and so you need to be happy with it.

~☆~☆~☆~☆~☆~☆~☆~☆~☆~☆~☆~☆~☆~☆~☆~☆~☆~☆~☆~☆~☆~☆~☆~☆~☆~

Gah! I know, I’m late again. But at least only by 20mins this time. I hope you found this article interesting.

What are your personal thoughts on using pen names? You for them, against them? Don’t care either way?

If you enjoy my blog, do please follow it. I upload new posts on Fridays at 18:30 BST (mostly).

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Happy writing

Ari

Photo purchased through http://www.depositphoto.com

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2 thoughts on “Using a Pen Name

  1. Don’t you know I was JUST reading about pen names no more than an hour ago?! Lol I use one only because my last name is a bit long and I don’t think I’d like how it would look on a book cover. I use my real first name and the “Ré” is just a part of my middle name. I thinn pen names depend on the person and how their real name will be portrayed to readers.

    • lol nice to see I’m blogging about a popular topic! 🙂 That’s a good point, the length and/or complication of a name can also be a reason people choose to use a Pen Name. 🙂

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